Ultrasound

An ultrasound uses soundwaves to produce a picture of your neck , sometimes called a sonogram, and allows the radiographer to review the lymph nodes on a screen. You can’t hear these sound waves, but when they bounce off different parts of the body, they create “echoes” that are picked up by the probe and turned into a moving image. This image is displayed on a monitor while the scan is carried out.

During an endoscopic ultrasound scan, an endoscope is inserted into your body, usually through your mouth, to examine areas such as your throat and food pipe (oesophagus). You’ll usually be asked to lie on your side as the endoscope is carefully pushed down towards your stomach. The endoscope has a light and an ultrasound device on the end. Once it’s been inserted into the body, sound waves are used to create images in the same way as an external ultrasound. You’ll usually be given a sedative to keep you calm and local anaesthetic spray to numb your throat, as an endoscopic ultrasound scan can be uncomfortable and may make you feel sick. You may also be given a mouth guard to keep your mouth open and protect your teeth, in case you bite the endoscope.